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Best High-Yield Savings Accounts of April 2024: Up To 5.25% APY

KEY TAKEAWAYS
  • High-yield savings accounts offer premium interest rates.
  • The best rates are often offered by online-only banks.
  • Current banks offering high-yield savings accounts include
    Western Alliance (5.24% APY), Capital One (4.25% APY), American Express (4.30% APY), SoFi (4.60% APY), UFB Direct (5.25% APY) and Quontic Bank (4.50% APY).
  • It’s important to learn key savings-related terms such as annual percentage yield, FDIC and compound interest.
  • Annual percentage yields (APY) fluctuate depending on Fed rates.
  • Before opening an account, ask about minimum balance requirements, monthly maintenance fees, service fees and other rules related to online savings.

Opening a high-yield savings account can help you protect your savings and make some extra money at the same time.

In this guide, we dig into the truth behind online savings accounts, including everything you need to know about interest-bearing banking, minimum balance requirements, account fees and what the FDIC does to protect your nest egg.

Our top picks for savings accounts

High-yield savings account rates

Unless otherwise stated, your savings account doesn’t have a fixed APY. Most interest rates tied to savings accounts will fluctuate, sometimes drastically, in accordance with changes in the Fed rates. This is called a variable rate.

When the economy is doing well, the Federal Reserve tends to raise rates and banks and credit unions follow suit. The Fed’s goal is to help stabilize the economy and even out consumer buying and spending.

When the economy is struggling, the Fed tends to lower rates and banks and credit unions react accordingly. This makes it easier for consumers to borrow money and funnel cash back into the marketplace, thereby stimulating the economy. Unfortunately, what’s good for the economy isn’t always the best for your savings account.

Savings account interest rates may also change just because the bank wants to change them. Traditional banks tend to be more conservative with their rates, but online banks may boost interest rates to stay competitive and attract new clients.

APY across U.S. banks plummeted during the 2020 pandemic, but they’ve slowly and steadily been making a comeback. According to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the average savings APY in April 2022 was just 0.06%. By January 2024, the average rate rose to 0.47%. Online banks often offer a high APY closer to the national savings rate cap, which since November 2023 has been set at 6.08%.

Best high-yield savings accounts for April 2024

Not all banks offer high-yield savings accounts. Here are some of the top rated banks offering high-yield savings accounts:

Bank APY Monthly fee Minimum opening deposit Withdrawal limits
Western Alliance 5.24% $0 $1 - No upper limit for withdrawals
LendingClub 5.00% $0 $100 - From $500 to $250,000, depending on the age of the account and your total balance
- No limit on the number of transfers
Synchrony 4.75% $0 $0 - $1,000 per day
- No limit on the number of times
Ally Bank 4.25% $0 $0 10 withdrawals per month
American Express 4.30% $0 $0 - 9 withdrawls per month
- To transfer money in and out, you need to link the savings account to a separate checking account
Marcus 4.50% $0 $0 No withdrawal limit
Barclays 4.35% $0 $0 - Withdrawal limit of $250,000 per transaction
- No limit on the number of times
Capital One 4.25% $0 $0 No withdrawal limit
Citibank 4.45% $4.50 $0 No withdrawal limit
PNC 4.65% $0 $0 Monthly withdrawal cap of 6 transactions

Other high-yield savings accounts:

Quontic Bank Savings Account

Open a Quontic High-Yield Savings Account in just 3 minutes with an APY of 4.50%*.

Start earning from day 1 of your first deposit with no limit on how much you can earn.

  • Competitive APY of 5.40%
  • No monthly service fees
  • $100 minimum deposit
  • Limit of 6 withdrawals per statement cycle

*APY means Annual Percentage Yield

Quontic Savings Account

7% interest savings accounts

As of April 2024, no banks are offering 7% interest rates on savings accounts. For more information, please see our guide 7% interest savings accounts.

5% interest savings accounts

It is possible to find a 5% interest savings accounts, especially if you’re willing to work with an online-only bank. Some of the banks offering the highest APY on savings accounts do require minimum deposit amounts and minimum average balances to ensure those high-interest earnings.

Are high-yield savings accounts safe?

Your online savings are safe as long as you’ve stowed them away in an FDIC-insured account. The FDIC protects consumer deposits for up to $250,000 per depositor, per institution. Anything up to $250,000 in a single account at a U.S. bank covered by the FDIC will be reimbursed to you if your bank or credit union fails.

If you have more than $250,000 to place in savings, it’s a good idea to maximize your protection by utilizing multiple accounts across multiple banks.

Otherwise, the only way you can lose money from your savings account is by paying out more in fees than you accrue in interest. Read the fine print on your account so you know exactly how much you’re paying in maintenance fees and other costs. Then, find out if there’s a way you can avoid those charges such as by raising your minimum balance or reducing your average number of monthly transactions.

What is a high-yield savings account?

High-yield savings accounts are designed to help people stockpile money while also generating extra funds courtesy of the best APY.

Imagine you’ve paid all your bills for the month and find yourself with some money left over. Or perhaps you’re intentionally building savings for a specific purpose, such as paying college tuition or completing a home remodel. Putting your cash in an interest-bearing online bank account helps maximize your return. Instead of just sitting there, your money is actually working for you.

Here’s how different online savings accounts and high APY can impact your savings*.

Type of account Initial deposit Interest rate/Annual percentage yield (APY) Time period Total ending amount
Standard savings account $5,000 0.43% 5 years $5,108.43
High-yield savings account $5,000 4% 5 years $6,083.26


*This chart demonstrates the basic difference between standard and higher-interest savings accounts, assuming interest compounds daily. The actual amount of interest accrued depends on various factors, including whether there are additional deposits, if the account terms include simple or compound interest and how often interest is compounded.

Note that most higher-interest accounts are offered by online banks and credit unions, as these institutions have less overhead compared to brick-and-mortar banks and can offer better rates for these types of savings accounts.

High-yield savings account terminology

As you get to know the ins and outs of high-yield saving accounts and how they work, it’s important to familiarize yourself with some of the most common and significant terminology.

How to choose the best high-interest savings account

Before you choose where to open your online savings account, consider these factors:

Pros and cons of a high-yield savings accounts

Below are some pros and cons of having a high-yield savings account.

Pros
  • Above average APY compared to traditional savings accounts.
  • High-yield savings accounts offered by FDIC-insured banks and credit unions are protected for up to $250,000 in deposits.
  • Typically offered and managed completely online, allowing for easy access, higher APY and greater flexibility.
Cons
  • Some high-yield savings accounts require higher minimum balances, which can be harder to meet for those just beginning to save money.
  • Low withdrawal limits can make it difficult to access your funds when you need to.
  • Some banks only offer high-yield accounts with attractive interest rates to new customers, meaning you may be forced to switch banks to take advantage of premium rates.
  • Online savings accounts may lack in customer service as there’s no ability to meet with bank representatives face-to-face.

Understanding the pros and cons of high-yield savings accounts can help you decide if a high-yield savings account is right for you, so you can start earning more interest than a regular savings account.

How to open a high-yield account

It’s fairly easy to open a high-yield online savings account.

You just need to provide basic information, such as your legal name, an up-to-date address and your Social Security number. For joint accounts, both parties need to provide the required information.

Next, you’ll need to fill out an application. Once you’re approved, you can make your initial minimum deposit and start earning interest!

What if I can’t open a high-interest savings account?

Banks sometimes deny online savings account applications if the applicant has a negative ChexSystems report or their credit score is too low. Even if you can’t open a high-interest account, you may get a better-than-average APY simply by opening a traditional online savings account.

Is a high-yield savings account worth it?

High-yield accounts are worth it if you’re looking to maximize your interest earnings and you don’t mind dealing with a few restrictions. Look for surcharge-free accounts and flexible terms to make the most of your banking relationship.

Alternatives to high-yield savings accounts

High-yield online savings accounts aren’t the only option for stowing away money and earning interest at the same time.

Here are some alternatives worth exploring:

Our top picks for savings accounts

FAQs: High-yield savings accounts

Why are most high-yield savings accounts online?

It’s more common to find high-yield savings accounts paired with online banking because online-only financial institutions have lower overhead and can afford to offer more attractive rates.

Are high-yield savings rates increasing?

Interest rates have been on the rise since 2022. This includes high-yield savings account rates, which are typically much closer to the savings national interest cap (about 6.08% as of November 2023) than the national average (about 0.46% as of November 2023).

Can I withdraw money from my high-yield savings account?

Most savings accounts set a limit on how many times you can make withdrawals every month. Unlike checking accounts, savings accounts aren’t designed to accommodate bill payments and daily needs such as point-of-sale transactions. That said, some banks allow savings account holders to make a certain amount of withdrawals each month without incurring fees or other penalties.

How often can I take money out of a high-yield savings account?

Most banks limit customers to a maximum of six savings account withdrawals per month. However, the Fed raised the recommended withdrawal limit in 2020 to help Americans cope with financial changes resulting from the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ask your bank about their guidelines to find out exactly how often you can access your savings and make sure you always maintain your minimum balance.

How do I move money in and out of a high-yield savings account?

You can move money in and out of your savings account using a wire transfer or ACH transfer or by linking your accounts and taking advantage of your bank’s mobile app. Some banks also offer account holders the ability to withdraw and deposit money to and from checking and savings accounts using an ATM card.

What is the highest interest high-yield savings account?

Online banks often offer the highest APY for savings accounts because they have less overhead and more room to adjust and experiment with competitive rates. Remember that APY is variable, not fixed, so the institution offering the highest rate today may have a lower rate tomorrow.

Alana Luna (Musselman)
Alana Luna (Musselman) Writer & Content Strategist

Alana Luna (Musselman) is a versatile storyteller with over a decade of writing experience. She is passionate about helping people build their business through unique and engaging content. Some examples of her current freelance projects include building content strategies for small businesses, completing industry research to build case studies, crafting buyer guides and more.

She has a passion and keen ability to simplify complex ideas through storytelling to make it easier for readers to understand hard-to-digest information. As such, Alana’s writing holds strong three principles – content that educates, engages and entertains.

Apart from her contributions to LA Times Compare, Alana has freelanced and ghostwritten for large publications and prestigious brands such as Orbitz, Groupon, Amazon, JCPenney, Walmart and more.

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