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Jason Potter reclines on a velvet sofa at Den
Jason Potter reclines on a velvet Roche Bobois modular sectional inside Den, his vintage showroom in East Hollywood.
(Mel Melcon/Los Angeles Times)

The 19 best stores to find Midcentury Modern furniture in L.A.

Whether you’re looking for an introductory Saarinen tulip chair or a $16,000 Mario Bellini modular sofa, there’s no better place to shop for Midcentury Modern furniture than Los Angeles.

The golden age of furniture design (which spans the late 1940s through the early 1970s) is more popular today than ever thanks to its simplicity and adaptability, says Christian Boehr, owner of the vintage showroom Atomic Threshold in Monrovia.

“The nicely proportioned scale, along with classic lines and great build quality, allows these pieces to be well integrated in current design schemes without being overpowering or too homogenized,” says Boehr.

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In other words, Midcentury Modern furnishings — many of which are still in production today because of their timelessness — are suitable for any type of decor.

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Although you can shop for Modernist furnishings online, via Facebook Marketplace, at local flea markets and on Instagram, there is nothing like being able to test out furniture in real life to see how it looks and feels.

“People like to come in, see the items and try them out in person,” says Tricia Benitez Beanum, founder and creative director of Pop Up Home in East Hollywood.

Here we offer a list of 18 stores in L.A. where you can bring your tape measure, inspect the goods and sample the seating. Before you head out, here are a few things to note:

Don’t be put off by showrooms that are open by appointment only. Many of them are run by limited staff or one person. I found it easy to email businesses and arrange a showroom visit.

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Also, double-check store hours before you head out for the same reason. And finally, keep in mind that vintage furnishings aren’t cheap. Therefore, connecting with dealers in person may allow you to strike a deal.

Showing  Places
A woman shops for Midcentury Modern furnishings at Amsterdam Modern.
(Myung J. Chun / Los Angeles Times)

Amsterdam Modern

Echo Park Vintage store
Expertly sourced by owner Ellen LeComte, who obtains her vintage finds from the Netherlands, this jam-packed 10,000-square-foot warehouse can be overwhelming — in a good way — if you’re a fan of Midcentury Modern design.

Shopping is surprisingly easy given that everything has a tag and is clearly marked with dimensions, designer and price. A set of four Arnold Merckx black leather dining chairs were priced at $2,750. A Poul Volther teak dresser was listed as $1,850, and a ribbed Ernst Luthy leather “Turf” love seat was tagged at $7,850.

While the headliner here is vintage furnishings, there is also a wide variety of gift options wedged among the teak dining room tables and chairs, including a selection of gorgeous vintage ceramics.

Despite the dizzying display of goods, the sales staff is incredibly adept in helping you find what you are looking for, whether it’s a Danish modern dining chair or a Modernist coat rack.

Open 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday.
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Midcentury Modern furniture in a showroom
(Christina House / Los Angeles Times)

Atomic Threshold

Monrovia Vintage store
Tucked away in a sleepy Monrovia business district, Atomic Threshold is a notably warm showroom filled with Midcentury Modern and Danish modern pieces from Europe that owner Christian Boehr has refinished himself.

Boehr has seating options covered, from dining room chairs to Plycraft lounge chairs ($6,495) and Brazilian leather sofas ($8,000 to $15,000) as well as refinished Danish modern credenzas and tables from coffee tables to dining and bedside options. Also, Boehr sells his custom footstools ($895 to $1,095) and lighting ($595) made from lathe-turned wood and ceramics.

From the standpoint of resource stewardship, Boehr observed that his customers “feel good about keeping quality vintage stock in use and circulation as opposed to buying new, less soulful furnishings, which will continue to be more of a consideration moving forward into the future.”

Open daily by appointment. Address provided upon request.
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CC Retro Shop displays dining room tables and shelving.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

CC Retro Shop

Uptown Whittier Vintage store
Founded in 2020 by husband-and-wife dealers Cindy Campos and Anthony Zarate, this Santa Fe Springs warehouse offers good deals on Midcentury estate sale finds and the Danish modern furnishings that Zarate refinishes on-site. Here, you will find tallboys and lowboys, a seven-piece modular sectional by Milo Baughman ($1,600) and lots of credenzas in teak and walnut.

“We sell a lot of china cabinets for some reason,” Zarate shrugs, proving you never know what will resonate with buyers.

Open by appointment.
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A pair of leather lounge chairs with lamps behind them in a furniture store showroom
(Mel Melcon / Los Angeles Times)

DEN Los Angeles

East Hollywood Vintage store
Jason Potter’s East Hollywood showroom, which offers high-end vintage goods from around the world, is a feast for the eyes, from the art and pottery-filled shelves to the enticing seating arrangements.

“For me, Midcentury Modern is more of a catch-all term for intentional designs and quality made furniture that focuses on form and function,” says Potter. “I focus on vintage pieces as I love the sustainability factor. As long as I stick to the parameters, our inventory will stay timeless and will integrate well with any home.”

On a recent visit, one-of-a-kind standouts included a two-piece sectional sofa in velvet by Edward Wormley ($48,000), a pair of leather Otto Zapf lounge chairs for Knoll ($8,000) and Architectural Pottery and David Cressy ceramic lamps.

For those not prepared to drop $30,000 on a George Nakashima dining table, Potter also offers some smaller, lower price point items as well as occasional sales on surplus goods.

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Chairs and a wall hanging on display at Design Utopia in Hollywood.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Design Utopia Hollywood

Hollywood Vintage store
For Lynne Nash, who got her start selling furniture 23 years ago, shopping for vintage is all about the hunt. “I’m the last of the great treasure hunt stores,” Nash says. “I try to focus on unusual pieces you won’t find anywhere else including art, china, pottery and backgammon games and chess sets.”

It’s fun to dig through her Melrose Avenue shop, with its colorful Joseph Magnin gift boxes from the 1960s, Paul McCobb china, a stunning Maria Kipp textile lampshade from the ’50s, patio furniture and Kai Kristiansen dining chairs. Prices are fair, ranging from the low to medium. Also, while Nash stocks custom pieces, the most interesting item during a recent visit wasn’t made by hand: It was a locking mechanism for a bank vault.

Open weekends and by appointment.
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A green sofa and stacked chairs among other furniture at Hernandez Furniture.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Hernandez Furniture

Hollywood Vintage store
For nearly three decades, this family-run storefront on Santa Monica Boulevard in Hollywood has offered vintage Midcentury Modern and Danish modern dining sets, sleek credenzas and larger-than-life lamps.

On a recent visit, owner Pedro Hernandez was on hand to point out Scandinavian ribbon-back dining chairs by Dux ($1,500 for four), a sculptural sofa outfitted in stunning green vintage fabric ($2,975) and a rosewood lounge chair by Ebanistería Caivinagua ($1,575).

Like so many vintage showrooms, there are lamps stacked on coffee tables stacked on credenzas, but it’s not off-putting. The staff is friendly and willing to pull down items for you to check out or offer further details about various items.

Open 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. Monday through Friday; 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
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Midcentury furnishings inside a store
(Lisa Boone/Los Angeles Times)

The Hunt Vintage Home Furnishings

Echo Park Vintage store
Michael Glotzer got his start as a set decorator — no doubt influenced by his antiques-dealing mother — and his love for the dramatic shows in the furnishings he sells in his Echo Park showroom.

“It’s my passion,” says Glotzer as he steers you past the vintage Knoll Pollock chairs ($800 apiece), Milo Baughman swivel chairs and a stunning ceramic-topped Danish modern coffee table ($1,950).

Sometimes he likes to leave the vintage pieces in their original condition, such as the enormous “Miami Vice” meets “Scarface” Vladimir Kagan-style curved sofa from the 1980s ($7,500). But other times, he says he prefers to wait to reupholster furnishings to his client’s requests.

Glotzer also produces his own line of custom Midcentury-style furnishings, spanning sofas to credenzas; all made in L.A., they can be built to any size and turned around quickly.

Open Monday by appointment; noon to 6 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday. (Tip: Have a shopping and lunch date. The showroom is within walking distance of the El Ruso taco truck.)
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A brown sofa next to a wall adorned with art in a showroom
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Merchant

Santa Monica Vintage store
Walking into Merchant in Santa Monica is like walking into an artist’s enclave packed with vintage furniture, antiques, contemporary ceramics and art.

“I wanted it to look like a house,” says co-owner Denise Portmans, who runs the store, along with an Atwater Village location, with her artist daughter Sara Marlowe. “I like things that are a little unusual.”

The stores are a homage to Portmans’ mother, an artist and ceramicist, and they are stocked with Midcentury Modern furniture, vintage Moroccan rugs, contemporary ceramics from Paris and Italy, and goods by local artists such as Heather Rosenman and All Roads Studio. On a recent visit to the Santa Monica store, prices ranged from $120 for a wooden wine rack to $2,500 for a vintage leather safari chair. Portmans also is open to making deals. (The second showroom, Merchant Modern East, is at 3127 Glendale Blvd. in Atwater Village. The phone number is (310) 266-0572.)

The Santa Monica showroom is open Monday to Wednesday by appointment; noon to 4 p.m. Thursday through Sunday. Atwater showroom hours are Monday and Tuesday by appointment; noon to 6 p.m. Wednesday through Friday; and 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
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A rust-colored sectional sofa and, behind it, a multicolored sectional sofa under mirrors on the wall
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

MidcenturyLA

North Hollywood Vintage store
This 12,000-square-foot warehouse offers a surplus of postmodern furnishings with a Midcentury feel including 1970s lounge chairs, marble Italian dining tables, Michel Ducaroy Togo chairs and couches, and a showstopping seven-seat Roche Bobois Mah Jong sofa outfitted in Kenzo fabric ($35,000).

The first two front rooms have the clean look of a high-end designer showroom and offer an opportunity to sink into the many low-slung circular sofas and lounge chairs on display.

I like to dig through the two less formal rooms in back, which are brimming with rugs, chairs and credenzas, and include many items on sale.

Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily.
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A pair of David Kawecki Puzzle Chairs stands on display at Motley Design Warehouse
(Silvia Razgova)

Motley Design Warehouse

Downtown L.A. Vintage store
Looking for a Paul McCobb bar cart? Fratelli Mannelli travertine giraffe sculptures? What about Walter Castle’s Molar Chair, the brightly colored one from the late 1960s with curves that made it resemble a giant tooth? You might find any of these at Motley’s downtown warehouse.

Motley specializes in vintage midcentury modern designs from Denmark and modern and contemporary art from California. Its 7th Street showrooms are packed with furniture — dining chairs, tables, desks, sofas, rugs and textiles, tableware and shelving, such as the modular 1970s Cado Royal System. A small space is devoted to vintage clothing. Find daily sale items in its outdoor parking lot.
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A showroom filled with furniture and artwork.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Pop Up Home

East Hollywood Vintage store
In May, Tricia Benitez Beanum relocated her luxury vintage showroom on Western Avenue to a three-story space across the street. Beanum’s new flagship offers goods from the ’50s through the ’80s, with new inventory arriving every week, largely from Europe.

“I wanted it to feel like New York,” Beanum says of the airy third floor, which is filled with curvaceous furnishings in leather, velvet and corduroy. “Everyone is interested in postmodern furnishings right now.” In addition to furniture and accessories, including a wide variety of ceramics, artwork is mixed in with the furniture and decor as part of UNREPD, a gallery devoted to emerging and mid-career artists of color as well as women artists and LGBTQIA+ artists.

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Furniture in an L.A. warehouse includes an assortment of sofas
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Saasaan

Downtown L.A. Vintage store
Wedged between Tijuana’s Produce and a wholesale spice mart, Saasaan Nabavi’s furniture warehouse in downtown L.A. is an unexpected find, filled with classic Midcentury Modern furnishings from both Denmark and Sweden as well as an excellent selection of antique and vintage Persian, Turkish Afghan and Moroccan rugs starting as low as $125.

Nabavi sells a large selection of leather sofas from Scandinavia, including Stouby and B?rge Mogensen designs starting at $595, as well as lounge chairs, cabinets (“Queer Eye’s” Bobby Berk scored one) and dining tables and chairs.

Some pieces, such as a Danish dining table in rosewood with three leaves ($2,500), have been refinished, while others, such as the teak sideboards and a quartet of teak dining chairs (on sale for $495), are in their original condition.

Open by appointment.
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A showroom filled with furniture and accessories.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

SV Modern

Pico Rivera Vintage store
Located next door to Sanford’s Vintage record shop, Vincent Gonzalez’s SV Modern offers a mix of Midcentury Modern furnishings, lighting and accessories for artists and musicians, says manager Joe Lopez.

The small showroom is loaded with mostly small-scale stuff — think chairs, side tables, credenzas and a few sofas. But Lopez says they have found their niche by pairing some of the bigger furnishings with art, accessories and music. “Our clients enjoy walking back and forth between the record shop and the furniture showroom,” he says. “They all want beautiful, original furnishings so they can be in an environment where they can create.”

Because the shop is small, don’t expect to see the same thing from month to month. That really won’t be an issue, Lopez says, because the store gets new things in to be sold every week.

Open weekdays by appointment and 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Saturday and Sunday.
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Furniture and accessories in a showroom.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

simplymod

San Dimas Vintage store
Michael Shaller’s elegant showroom in San Dimas features Scandinavian furnishings as well as some rare treasures, such as a Sam Maloof-designed side chair by Idaho-based Mike Raub ($2,680) and a teak-and-oak Ikea cabinet from the 1940s ($740).

Shaller has been dealing in Midcentury furniture since 1996 and goes to Denmark yearly in search of beautifully designed goods. “I like good design,” he says. “Danish quality is on another level — the types of wood that were used such as teak and rosewood.”

The showroom is filled with sofas and chairs, credenzas, pendants from Norway and Denmark, and artworks and ceramics from all over the world. Many of his finds are not in the showroom itself, so if you have a special request, contact him directly. He just might have it, and if not, he likely can find it for you.

Open by appointment and noon to 5 p.m. Thursday through Saturday.
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Midcentury modern furniture including a metal fireplace at Sunbeam Vintage in Highland Park.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Sunbeam Vintage

Highland Park Vintage store
Although the emphasis here is on vintage Midcentury Modern furniture, owner Iberia Martinez also offers the Modern Collection, Midcentury-inspired goods that are made today, and a Sunbeam Exclusive collection of wooden credenzas, benches and shelves that are handmade to order in Los Angeles.

Many of the furnishings in the 6,500-square-foot former movie theater are displayed in period vignettes, including a baroque living room with chandelier and gold lamé walls, a Midcentury cabin with an Eames lounge chair, a velvet sofa and fireplace, and a cozy den with a velvet sofa and a Danish modern wall unit.

A second space on Figueroa Street, which offered a large inventory of smaller goods including one-of-a-kind glassware, ceramics and artworks starting as low as $25, recently closed, but keep a look out for a new boutique a few blocks down the street in the future.

Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
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A stall displays several chairs and lamps at Urban Americana in Long Beach.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Urban Americana

Long Beach Vintage store
This 16,000-square-foot warehouse offers vintage items from more than 40 dealers, including Midcentury Modern furniture and a large selection of colorful glazed ceramic metal fireplaces.

The finds on a recent visit included a leather and chrome Wasily chair by Marcel Breuer ($495), a Westnofa dining table with four chairs ($6,995), a pair of rare sculpted Modeline of California lamps ($2,995) and bright-red Eames molded plastic chairs ($220 apiece).

For your al fresco needs, a large outdoor area offers a wide assortment of vintage ceramic planters and outdoor patio furniture.

Open 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. daily.
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Furniture and accessories in a showroom.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Vintage Concept

Hollywood Vintage store
Jose and Ray Hernandez’s vintage showroom may be just a few doors down from their family’s longtime store, Hernandez Furniture, but it’s clearly their own vision. “They want to do things their own way,” said their father, Pedro, with a sense of pride.

Like their father, the brothers specialize in 20th century design and Midcentury Modern and Danish modern furniture and accessories; they also offer restoration and upholstery services.

The pair opened a second showroom right next door, which offers more Midcentury pieces along with artworks. You might find a Fritz Hansen leather and wood armchair ($1,200), a vintage Adrian Pearsall-style Cloud chaise ($1,800), a George Kasparian club chair reupholstered in soft gray sherpa fabric ($975) or a pair of fully restored Brasilia nightstands ($1,650).

Open 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday through Friday; 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Saturday; and noon to 5 p.m. Sunday.
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Furniture and accessories, including a turquoise sofa, in a showroom.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

West Coast Modern L.A.

Vintage store
Luis Ramirez’s vintage store on Fairfax Avenue is a mix of American and Danish Midcentury Modern furniture as well as his line of contemporary Midcentury-inspired sofas, lounge chairs and credenzas.

You might find the perfect dining room chair, Sputnik pendant or Berber-covered Eames lounge chair, but you can also create something new. Ramirez has stacks of fabrics on hand if you are interested in ordering a custom sofa, sectional or chair to your specifications. The walnut Midcentury-inspired credenzas, which are made to order in custom sizes and finishes, have hand-carved sculptural doors.

Open 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday and noon to 4 p.m. Sunday.
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Furniture stacked in a warehouse.
(Lisa Boone / Los Angeles Times)

Vintage on Point

Downtown L.A. Vintage store
Vintage on Point’s warehouse in downtown L.A. offers a wide selection of furnishings spanning Midcentury Modern to postmodern, but that doesn’t mean Midcentury enthusiasts will leave disappointed.

On a recent visit, the packed warehouse offered reasonably priced Danish modern credenzas, side tables and drawers in rosewood and teak (starting at $375), a Paul McCobb dining table with three extensions ($2,500) and some fun Mobler dining room chairs that were outfitted in herringbone fabric ($1,100 for a set of four).

Also, there was a selection of newly upholstered sofas — the family-run business specializes in restoration, fabrication and upholstery — that were extra appealing given the fact that you could sit down and try them out in the showroom. For instance, a comfortable cantilevered chrome and tweed sofa from the ’70s was on sale for $1,275.

Open 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Saturday.
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